RapGenius.com & Sony/ATV Secure Licensing Deal

posted Sunday November 17 ,2013 at 10:00AM CST | 14 comments

RapGenius.com & Sony/ATV Secure Licensing Deal

Rap Genius has obtained a licensing deal with the world's largest music publisher.

Last week, it was reported that RapGenius.com was among 50 lyrics sites that were sent take-down notices by the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA), requesting that the sites either obtain licenses to publish lyrics or remove copyright lyrics from their sites.

Now, Rap Genius has revealed that it obtained a licensing deal with Sony/ATV Music Publishing, reports Billboard.

Martin Bandier, Chairman & CEO of Sony/ATV Music Publishing, addressed the website, stating that it allows songwriters and fans to connect in a "new and exciting way."

Other licensing deals are the goal, as Rap Genius co-founder Tom Lehman referred the conversation with other music publishers and said the site's relationship with artists "will only grow stronger" as more licensing deals are reached.

The ultimate goal, however, is "to add context to all important texts in peoples lives," said Lehman. Rap Genius has also launched sites for Rock, poetry, and news, and hope to create a paid enterprise service for business users.

Sony/ATV is the world's largest music publisher with approximately 31% of the global market. However, the majority of songs cataloged by Rap Genius are not yet licensed.

NMPA President and CEO David Israelite explained that he wants to facilitate licensing deals, not shut down unlicensed sites. "We simply want those that are making money off lyrics to be business partners with the songwriters who created the content that is the basis of the sites," he said.

In 2012, RapGenius.com added Nas as an advisor.

RELATED: RapGenius.com Among Sites Targeted Over Use Of Lyrics

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Comments 14 Posts

  • sxxx9
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jpe1QieFGBw
  • sxxx9
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epP7i7unWdU
  • Dick B
    lol, they keep you using pictures of Nas for these RapGenius articles like he's the face of the company or something.
    • STATUS
      Cause he is the Rap Genius!!!..
  • David
    I love RapGenius
  • Delores Johannsen
    uptil I looked at the draft four $7430, I didnt believe that...my... brothers friend was like they say actualy erning money part-time on their laptop.. there uncle haz done this for only about seventeen months and recently cleared the mortgage on their house and bought a great audi. check out here... www.Fb39.Com i'm hot and give me my props/ And stopping is not an option/ I feel like i'm God's Son/ I know i'm not Pac, Nas, or Eminem/ But you still get my sentiments/ I've been sent here to rap/ And kick facts for these cats/ Got dog barking other side of the tracks/ And that's that
    • Anonymous
      i dont understand the rapping
  • Anonymous
    RapGenius would do the same thing if people were using their property. If I did RapLyricBreakdown & used Rapgenius' annotations they would be mad, so cut out the bullsh^t like they should be able to use other people's copyrighted music but shouldn't ask for permission, that's some pussy sh^t.
    • Anonymous
      they're not using shit. they don't leave the annotations ppl do, they just made the framework.
    • Anonymous
      aka using other people's intellectual property for profit
  • FinessetheArtist
    Not sure if this will be taken serious, or seen by anyone who can answer appropriately. But, as a verified RapGenius artist, what does that mean for my lyrics posted there?
    • d mac
      Seems like they're determining usage of lyric compositions on the 'net. Although they were saying just because they were annotations, the law says you have to ask permission for licensed material. The Sony deal is cool, many of the rap lyrics are off of UMG artists. The end results of the EMI split up. Hopefully you have copyrights, aka get paperwork for everything you do in this rap game.
  • Anonymous
    Rap Genius' business model involves using other people's intellectual property to dominate search results for song lyrics to scam money from investors. This paid off handsomely last year in the form of a $15 million windfall from venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz, headed up by Mitt Romney donor Marc Andreessen and Ben Horowitz, son of Southern Poverty Law Center-certified racist David Horowitz. The NMPA, a group that tries to collect licensing fees from scammers on behalf of music publishers, commissioned a study by David Lowery, the guy from Crack3r and Camper Van Beethoven, who apparently is also a mathematician and teaches music business at the University of Georgia. He might also be one of the guys who wrote an angry editorial about how indie musicians can't make any money from Spotify, not just because relatively few people are interested in listening to indie music, but because Spotify pays an apartheid rate to indie labels. It's somehow even less than what they pay major labels. Because Spotify lives to promote bad music. Lowery used his skills as a mathematician, along with his experience not making any money in the music business (I'm sure it's a good class though), to put together a list of the top 50 lyrics sites that probably haven't obtained a proper license to post song lyrics. The list is in descending order based on which sites turned up the highest search results for names of songs and artists and thus were most likely to make a shedload of money using someone else's intellectual property. Of course Rap Genius topped the list. According to an article yesterday in billboard.biz, the NMPA has sent take-down notices to every site on the list. I checked Rap Genius just now, and it looks like they've still got song lyrics up. So they might get sued. I wouldn't check any of those other sites, lest my five year-old Acer Aspire come down with a virus and I had to put RackRadar, but from what I understand a lot of them are based in Russia and could probably give a rat's ass about your silly take-down notice. If you went over there trying to collect your court-ordered, some mafia guy would just kill you and bribe the police not to call it in. The NMPA, headed up by a guy named David Israelite (no, really), already sued a sketchy lyrics site founded by one of the guys who founded MySpace for [Austin Powers voice] $6.6 million. If you check the LiveUniverse site now, all you get is that notice from the hosting company saying that the domain name has expired. They couldn't even afford to get that shit renewed. They also sued a company called Motive Force, which ran LyricsWiki, for an undisclosed sum. Really, all you need to know about this guy is that his name is David Israelite. There's basically no way he can lose in court. One of the kids from Rap Genius told Billboard that they shouldn't have to obtain licenses to post song lyrics, because Rap Genius annotates song lyrics, and that's why people visit Rap Genius, right, to have ebonics translated into plain English by people who were born in 1998? He said he couldn't wait to have a conversation about how all songwriters can benefit from Rap Genius, which I took to mean that they plan to invite the guy from Crack3r to Rap Genius' offices in Williamsburg, where they'll try to ply him with weed and allow him to awkwardly glance up that one chick's skirt. They pulled the same shit with Chief Keef, who's now in some court-ordered rehab. You can't get court-ordered rehab for weed, right? They're also trying to argue that many artists were dumb enough to go up there and type in their own lyrics. As explained to me by some young guy on Twitter who assured me he was familiar with the law, if you type your own lyrics into Rap Genius, you sacrifice your right to sue for any money they make from your intellectual property down the line. I tried to explain to these dumbass rappers that they should stop going up there, getting high and typing in their own lyrics, and yet week in and week out I see more and more rappers going up there. Sean Price probably can't afford to buy his own weed. If I were him, I'd try to argue that typing my own lyrics into Rap Genius shouldn't count, because I was high on what I was told was the kind of weed you can buy with $15 million, but who knows what that shit was? Chief Keef smoked it, and now he's locked up in a looney bin with shermheads who got caught wandering the streets naked. Furthermore, how can anyone who works for Rap Genius ever be sure that it was Sean Price who typed in those lyrics. It could have just as easily been Dallas Penn. It's a known fact that they can't tell black people apart.
    • Anonymous
      Rap Genius' business model involves using other people's intellectual property to dominate search results for song lyrics to scam money from investors. This paid off handsomely last year in the form of a $15 million windfall from venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz, headed up by Mitt Romney donor Marc Andreessen and Ben Horowitz, son of Southern Poverty Law Center-certified racist David Horowitz. The NMPA, a group that tries to collect licensing fees from scammers on behalf of music publishers, commissioned a study by David Lowery, the guy from Crack3r and Camper Van Beethoven, who apparently is also a mathematician and teaches music business at the University of Georgia. He might also be one of the guys who wrote an angry editorial about how indie musicians can't make any money from Spotify, not just because relatively few people are interested in listening to indie music, but because Spotify pays an apartheid rate to indie labels. It's somehow even less than what they pay major labels. Because Spotify lives to promote bad music. Lowery used his skills as a mathematician, along with his experience not making any money in the music business (I'm sure it's a good class though), to put together a list of the top 50 lyrics sites that probably haven't obtained a proper license to post song lyrics. The list is in descending order based on which sites turned up the highest search results for names of songs and artists and thus were most likely to make a shedload of money using someone else's intellectual property. Of course Rap Genius topped the list. According to an article yesterday in billboard.biz, the NMPA has sent take-down notices to every site on the list. I checked Rap Genius just now, and it looks like they've still got song lyrics up. So they might get sued. I wouldn't check any of those other sites, lest my five year-old Acer Aspire come down with a virus and I had to put RackRadar, but from what I understand a lot of them are based in Russia and could probably give a rat's ass about your silly take-down notice. If you went over there trying to collect your court-ordered, some mafia guy would just kill you and bribe the police not to call it in. The NMPA, headed up by a guy named David Israelite (no, really), already sued a sketchy lyrics site founded by one of the guys who founded MySpace for [Austin Powers voice] $6.6 million. If you check the LiveUniverse site now, all you get is that notice from the hosting company saying that the domain name has expired. They couldn't even afford to get that shit renewed. They also sued a company called Motive Force, which ran LyricsWiki, for an undisclosed sum. Really, all you need to know about this guy is that his name is David Israelite. There's basically no way he can lose in court. One of the kids from Rap Genius told Billboard that they shouldn't have to obtain licenses to post song lyrics, because Rap Genius annotates song lyrics, and that's why people visit Rap Genius, right, to have ebonics translated into plain English by people who were born in 1998? He said he couldn't wait to have a conversation about how all songwriters can benefit from Rap Genius, which I took to mean that they plan to invite the guy from Crack3r to Rap Genius' offices in Williamsburg, where they'll try to ply him with weed and allow him to awkwardly glance up that one chick's skirt. They pulled the same shit with Chief Keef, who's now in some court-ordered rehab. You can't get court-ordered rehab for weed, right? They're also trying to argue that many artists were dumb enough to go up there and type in their own lyrics. As explained to me by some young guy on Twitter who assured me he was familiar with the law, if you type your own lyrics into Rap Genius, you sacrifice your right to sue for any money they make from your intellectual property down the line. I tried to explain to these dumbass rappers that they should stop going up there, getting high and typing in their own lyrics, and yet week in and week out I see more and more rappers going up there. Sean Price probably can't afford to buy his own weed. If I were him, I'd try to argue that typing my own lyrics into Rap Genius shouldn't count, because I was high on what I was told was the kind of weed you can buy with $15 million, but who knows what that shit was? Chief Keef smoked it, and now he's locked up in a looney bin with shermheads who got caught wandering the streets naked. Furthermore, how can anyone who works for Rap Genius ever be sure that it was Sean Price who typed in those lyrics. It could have just as easily been Dallas Penn. It's a known fact that they can't tell black people apart.