Big K.R.I.T. Speaks On Almost Quitting Music, Reveals Why His Projects Are Free

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Big K.R.I.T. Speaks On Almost Quitting Music, Reveals Why His Projects Are Free

Big K.R.I.T. says the success of "K.R.I.T. Wuz Here" kept him from quitting music, speaks on giving away free music.

According to Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T., if it weren’t for the success of 2010’s K.R.I.T. Wuz Here there likely would have not been a Return Of 4eva or a 4Eva N A Day. The rapper explained that K.R.I.T. Wuz Here was his “last hurrah” meaning if it didn’t do well he planned on moving back home and getting a job. 
On top of his “last hurrah” moment K.R.I.T. also explained that the overwhelming response from K.R.I.T. Wuz Here was part of the reason why he decided to release another free, album-like project.
“K.R.I.T. Wuz Here was the last hurrah kind of feeling. You know what I’m saying? If this doesn’t work I’m going back home. I’mma just go get a job. I don’t want to hold off from putting ‘Moon & Stars’ on there. I don’t wanna not put ‘Small As A Giant’ on this. Let’s put all of this on there. That’s why the first project is 22 songs,” K.R.I.T. explained to HipHopWired.com. “And it was like let’s just go all out. And it got that kind of response. And then I was like well Return Of 4eva I gotta do the same thing. We gotta go all out. Let’s put the ‘Country Shit (Remix)’ with Bun and Ludacris for free. I got this record with Raheem DeVaughn let’s put that out there. The record with Joi and David Banner and like let’s treat it like an album.”
Later in the interview K.R.I.T. went further into detail on why he’s decided to release his projects to fans for free. The rapper explained that on top of the projects always being free in his mind there was also the issue of sampling. 
“These projects are free. They always been free and in my mind I made ‘em to be free,” said K.R.I.T. “And then I sample enough to where they gotta be free anyway. A record like ‘1986’ got two samples in it. You know what I’m saying? So monetarily it would be difficult to, once you clear these samples, it’d be difficult to make money off ‘em anyway. Now when it comes to my retail project, not so much.”
RELATED: Big K.R.I.T. Talks Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Influence On Music, Conscious Rap In The Modern Era

According to Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T., if it weren’t for the success of 2010’s K.R.I.T. Wuz Here there likely would have been no Return Of 4eva or a 4Eva N A Day. The rapper explained that K.R.I.T. Wuz Here was his “last hurrah” moment, meaning if it didn’t do well he planned on moving back home and getting a job. 

On top of his “last hurrah” moment K.R.I.T. also explained that the overwhelming response from K.R.I.T. Wuz Here was part of the reason why he decided to release another free, album-like project.

K.R.I.T. Wuz Here was the last hurrah kind of feeling. You know what I’m saying? If this doesn’t work I’m going back home. I’mma just go get a job. I don’t want to hold off from putting ‘Moon & Stars’ on there. I don’t wanna not put ‘Small As A Giant’ on this. Let’s put all of this on there. That’s why the first project is 22 songs,” K.R.I.T. explained to HipHopWired.com. “And it was like let’s just go all out. And it got that kind of response. And then I was like well Return Of 4eva I gotta do the same thing. We gotta go all out. Let’s put the ‘Country Shit (Remix)’ with Bun and Ludacris for free. I got this record with Raheem DeVaughn let’s put that out there. The record with Joi and David Banner and like let’s treat it like an album.”

Later in the interview K.R.I.T. went further into detail on why he’s decided to release his projects to fans for free. The rapper explained that on top of the projects always being free in his mind there was also the issue of sampling. 

“These projects are free. They always been free and in my mind I made ‘em to be free,” said K.R.I.T. “And then I sample enough to where they gotta be free anyway. A record like ‘1986’ got two samples in it. You know what I’m saying? So monetarily it would be difficult to, once you clear these samples, it’d be difficult to make money off ‘em anyway. Now when it comes to my retail project, not so much.”

RELATED: Big K.R.I.T. Talks Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Influence On Music, Conscious Rap In The Modern Era

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