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The Weeknd - Trilogy

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In the land of The Weeknd(TM)s "Trilogy," decadence still reigns supreme.

There hasn’t been many scenarios like The Weeknd’s, where a debut artist gets a three-disc official debut. The mixture of sex, drugs, and women isn’t an unorthodox combo, but at the time of The Weekend’s first mixtape release distorted beats over a high-range falsetto was fresh and incredibly difficult not to pay attention to.
Essentially, Trilogy is a repackaging which joins House of Balloons, Thursday, and Echoes of Silence together to introduce The Weeknd to a mass audience. Every mixtape is even sequenced the same as it was in its release. The only real element that’s been added is a 10th track to punctuate the end of the three mixtapes with “Twenty Eight”, “Valerie”, and “Till Dawn (Here Comes the Sun).” It’s a telling picture of how much has change for the Canadian artist whose true identity was kept under wraps for some time before the House of Balloons mixtape was released. Unlike the covers of his mixtapes where women were the main focus, on the Triology compilation cover we’re able to see Abel Tesfaye with the arms of a blurred woman around him.
“High For This” (Entourage fans, remember that awesome Entourage teaser?  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Z1yM-JWjQA) and “Lonely Star” still resound as great album openers. Heavy musical influence really shines in “Twenty Eight” where Abel evokes Michael Jackson with pleading vocals in one of the most love ailed tracks in Trilogy. Bonus track, “Valerie”, has the Canadian vocalist poignantly singing, “There comes a time in a man's life/He must take responsibility/For the choices he has made” before he declares his love. “Till Dawn (Here Comes the Sun)” really finalizes the end of Trilogy with the simple thought of an impending sunrise.
In the land of The Weeknd’s Triology decadence still reigns supreme. Rolling blunts, declaring ones love, propositions for threesomes, and prescription drug addiction are scenarios that serve as the soundtrack of the over-indulgent young nightlife and its resulting dawn. The mixtapes remain practically untouched giving any new The Weeknd fans a genuine look into what allowed an unknown to transform himself into someone who breathed new life into R&B.

There haven’t been many scenarios like The Weeknd’s, where a debut artist gets a three-disc official debut. The mixture of sex, drugs, and women isn’t an unorthodox combo. However, at the time of The Weekend’s first mixtape release House Of Balloons, distorted beats over a high-range falsetto was fresh and incredibly difficult not to pay attention to.

Essentially, Trilogy is a repackaging which joins House of Balloons, Thursday, and Echoes of Silence together to introduce The Weeknd to a mass audience. Every mixtape is even sequenced the same as it was in its release. The only real element that’s been added is a 10th track to punctuate the end of the three mixtapes with “Twenty Eight,” “Valerie,” and “Till Dawn (Here Comes the Sun).” It’s a telling picture of how much has changed for the Canadian artist whose true identity was kept under wraps for some time before the House of Balloons mixtape was released. Unlike the covers of his mixtapes where women were the main focus, on the Triology compilation cover we’re able to see Abel Tesfaye with the arms of a blurred woman around him.

“High For This” (Entourage fans, remember that awesome teaser?) and “Lonely Star” still resound as great album openers. Heavy musical influence really shines in “Twenty Eight,” where Abel evokes Michael Jackson with pleading vocals in one of the most love ailed tracks in Trilogy. Bonus track, “Valerie,” has the Canadian vocalist poignantly singing, “There comes a time in a man's life/He must take responsibility/For the choices he has made,” before he declares his love. “Till Dawn (Here Comes the Sun)” really finalizes the end of Trilogy with the simple thought of an impending sunrise.

In the land of The Weeknd’s Trilogy, decadence still reigns supreme. Rolling blunts, declaring one's love, propositions for threesomes, and prescription drug addiction are scenarios that serve as the soundtrack of the over-indulgent young nightlife and its resulting dawn. The mixtapes remain practically untouched, giving any new The Weeknd fans a genuine look into what allowed an unknown artist to transform himself into someone who breathed new life into R&B.

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